Cyber security will be the defining battle of the next decade. Hence the critical need for greater innovation and collaboration that leads to more transparent and secure networks.

HTR Engineering has been responsible for developing and implementing overall cyber security strategies including efforts related to the concept of "Precognition" and “Precognitive Capabilities”, a focused approach to PREDICTING, PREVENTING and PERSISTING against cyber incidents.

Our Engineers cover all aspects of cyber security. We can prepare in-depth studies and analyses. We can manage major information security efforts and perform independent work or manage a team in support of a customer either on-site or off-site.

HTR Engineering serves as Cyber Security advisor. Our work includes the scoping of tasks including the assessing of current IT security postures and developing a framework, based on ISO, SANS, NIST and other relevant best practices, for performing both baseline and on-going security assessments, to include full scale vulnerability assessments, targeted vulnerability scans and penetrating testing. Deliverables include comprehensive Security and Risk Assessment Strategies, focused on Predicting, Preventing and Persisting against cyber incidents.

HTR Engineers have assisted in the development of strategy and innovation to secure private and defence networks that hold their sensitive data. Our Engineers have extensive experience in:

  • Enterprise architecture
  • Collaboration
  • Monitoring and authentication
  • Network visibility and modernization
  • Insider threats
  • Big data and technical enablement

HTR Engineering Staff also foresee an increase in Cyber Security issues caused by exploiting Internal Staff and the Social Engineering aspects of Cyber Security. This includes:

  • Baiting is when an attacker leaves a malware-infected physical device, such as a USB flash drive or CD-ROM, in a place it is sure to be found. The finder then picks up the device and loads it onto his or her computer, unintentionally installing the malware.
  • Phishing is when a malicious party sends a fraudulent email disguised as a legitimate email, often purporting to be from a trusted source. The message is meant to trick the recipient into installing malware on his or her computer or device, or sharing personal or financial information.
  • Pretexting is when one party lies to another to gain access to privileged data. For example, a pretexting scam could involve an attacker who pretends to need personal or financial data in order to confirm the identity of the recipient.
  • Quid pro quo. A quid pro quo is when an attacker requests personal information from a party in exchange for something desirable. For example, an attacker could request login credentials in exchange for a free gift.
  • Spam is unsolicited junk email.
  • Pretexting is when one party lies to another to gain access to privileged data. For example, a pretexting scam could involve an attacker who pretends to need personal or financial data in order to confirm the identity of the recipient.